Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., Holiday Celebration!!

Black History Month in the Workplace!!

So earlier this week I gave a workshop presentation on celebrating Black History Month in the workplace, nothing like finding new ways to incorporate new experiences in your daily routine. And I just wanted to make sure I shared some resources from that talk just in case it may be useful for my followers!!

Why BHM is Important in The Workplace? “Dig deeper, look closer, think bigger.”

  • Race can be complicated, but we have to engage and talk about the comforts and discomforts
  • Reimagine the possibilities
  • Normalize what has been often made invisible
  • Opportunity for active learning
  • Another way to regularly incorporate inclusivity, equity, and work towards eliminating bias
  • Black History is American History even World History!!
  • A continued engagement with history and the Black experience and helps to give context for the present and future
  • February can be the starting point to year-round efforts
Photo by Marc Mueller on Pexels.com

#BlackHistory365 ideas that can be implemented in the workplace…

  • Bring in speakers (This is a chance to learn and gain new perspectives from others outside of your office.)
  • Organize a thematic book club (Monthly or Quarterly….You can also carry this out in February as well as other months such as Women’s History and Hispanic Heritage Month)
  • Virtual cooking session (Swap recipes, select a region and do a virtual potluck, create a “Culinary Journey Passport”)
  • Create a digital board for continuous learning and growth (Slack has become a popular tool that can be used here!)
  • Community Service/Volunteer (You can never have enough community service, and now there are multiple ways to carry out this endeavor!)
  • Promote Inclusion via Reflection-Collaboration-Recognition
  • Organize/create a Black History Internet Scavenger Hunt that uses questions that pertain to African American people and moments
Photo by JorgeArturo Andrade on Pexels.com

Next Steps to #BlackHistory365

  • In addition to the collective effort, think about what YOU can do. … What is your contribution?
  • What role can you play? Invest in your efforts!!
  • Pay it forward.
  • Create safe spaces…The energy and creativity will flow when people feel as though it is welcomed and appreciated!
  • Think before you post and act..Make sure your efforts are genuine. Learn and grow because you want to, not just to check off a box. Do your research…Remember why you are celebrating
  • Don’t play the buzzword and pandering game (Avoid situations like Bath and Body )
  • Ask the hard questions…that’s how you get answers and learn at the same time.
  • Play the long game…How can Black History Month transform and evolve into #BlackHistory365 in your place of work??

And for the road…Some additional resources, recommendations, and guides…

The great thing about all of this is that it can many things in one FUN, INFORMATIVE, ENGAGING and UPLIFTING!

For additional information and resources, check out the full guide here!!

Posted in New Trailer Alerts!!, On The Radar

Weekly Trailer Alerts!!

Starting you out with one of my faves on Netflix, a little drama, a splash of an action thriller, and closing you out with a Marvel treat! Sounds good to me!! Check them out below:

Season 2-Raising Dion (Streaming on Netflix February 1)

Limited Series-Inventing Anna (Streaming on Netflix February 11)

Severance (Streaming on Apple TV+ February 18)

Gasoline Alley (In theaters February 25)

Moon Knight (Streaming on Disney+ March 30)

Posted in Feature Spotlight, On The Radar

For All My Readers Out There!!

So as I was going through my emails this weekend (the neverending saga lol), I came across one from my colleague about a new Black-owned bookstore opening up here in Richmond. I immediately clicked on the message to get more info on this discovery!!

For all my Richmond folks, or folks who will be coming through the area there is a new bookstore coming to the Shockoe Slip area in February 5th, 2022 (right around the corner) called “The Book Bar”!!

The Book Bar is “a Black-owned, woman-owned bookstore that centers BIPOC authors and brands in effort to uplift and support a culture that is often silenced.” Owned by New Jersey native Krystle Dandridge, The Book Bar will be one of the few Black-owned bookstores in Richmond. The importance of having a space such as this is very personal for Dandridge, “growing up, I don’t think I walked into any business where the owner looked like me,” she says. “Worked there? Yes. But owned it? No. Representation matters. I used to walk into any bookstore and it was difficult to find books by authors who look like me. It’s just not considered what is mainstream even though there are a lot of them out there. Our country is diverse, so I wanted to create a space where folks can find diverse reads.”

The Book Bar logo

For me this is essential as well, considering I am always trying to find safe spaces to chill and relax as well as support. [The Book Bar has also be added to my list of Black owned bookstores, which you can find in the “Resource Guide” section.] And as an added bonus a potential new hang out spot!!

Intentional Reading | Books | Style Weekly - Richmond, VA local news, arts,  and events.
The Book Bar owner Kyrstle Dandridge (Photo credit: Scott Elmquist)

In addition to this being a bookstore customers will also be able to support and purchase from other vendors and Black-owned businesses. And if you want a little something extra you can take part in the quarterly subscription box, which includes a book and a range of products (i.e. wine, bath bombs, socks and snacks). And as you shop, customers will be able to enjoy a lounge style setting with relaxing R&B and neo soul vibes as their soundtrack to keep you in the mood.

Let me just say I look very much to visiting The Book Bar and making some regular purchases!!

And when it is all said and done, mark your calendars, get your coins ready, and if you are out of town (prepare for a visit)!! Now while you wait for the physical grand opening (Feb. 5th) make sure to check out The Book Bar online at rvabookbar.com as well their corresponding social media outlets: Facebook, Instagram= @rvabookbar , and YouTube!!

Happy Reading & Happy Shopping!!

Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., On The Radar

Dr. G’s Pop Culture Faves-A Year in Review

2021 is just about over, but not before I share a few of my pop culture faves!! I wanted to compile a list of few of favorite shows, movies, comic books, documentaries, short films, podcasts, and soundtracks that made an impact on me in a major way this year!!

These are a few of my favorite things from 2021…Check them out below*:

  • Comic Books/Graphic Novels
  • Eve (Victor LaValle, Boom! Studios)
  • Far Sector (N.K. Jemisin/Jamal Campbell, DC Comics)
  • Nubia and the Amazons (Stephanie Williams/Ayala Vita, DC Comics)
  • Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts (Rebecca Hall/Penguin Books)
  • Run: Book One (John Lewis/Andrew Aydin/Nate Powell/L. Fury, Abrams Books)
  • Bitter Root (David Walker/Chuck Brown/Image Comics)
  • Podcasts: True-crime reigned supreme in this category!! Gotta love a good mystery.
  • Jemele Hill is Unbothered
  • Suspect
  • Over My Dead Body
  • Dr. Death
  • Movies
  • The Harder They Fall (Netflix): An ode to Westerns done in style!!
  • No Time To Die: Ahhh where will the Bond legacy go next
  • Candyman: Thank you Nia Dacosta for this beautiful piece of horror!!
  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of Ten Rings: 10/10
  • Spider-Man: No Way Home
  • Zola: A movie that offers A LOT of different perspectives regarding one weekend!
  • The Unforgivable (Netflix)
  • Army of the Dead/Army of Thieves (Netflix)
  • Gunpowder Milkshake (Netflix): More action films with women leads especially those of color is definitely needed!!
  • Raya and the Last Dragon
  • Judas and the Black Messiah
  • King Richard
  • Concrete Cowboy (Netflix): I’m a sucker for a good western and some Black history!
  • Cruella: Who says you can’t like villains!
  • Dune
  • The Tomorrow War (Prime Video)
  • Red Notice (Netflix): Ryan Reynolds…That’s all I gotta say!
  • Outside the Wire (Netflix)
  • Short Films
  • Us Again (Disney+)
  • Don’t Go Tellin’ Your Momma
  • Twenty Something (Disney+)
  • Bao (Disney+)
  • For the Birds (Disney+)
  • Loop (Disney+)
  • How to Raise a Black Boy
  • Documentary
  • My Name is Pauli Murray
  • Summer of Soul (Hulu)
  • Pride (Hulu)
  • This is Pop (Netflix)
  • Blood Brothers: Malcolm X & Muhammad Ali (Netflix)
  • Mary J. Blige’s My Life (Prime Video)
  • Television Shows
  • Insecure (HBO Max): That last episode… (chef’s kiss)….The end of an era…Sunday nights will never be the same… (le sigh) #DayOne
  • The Wonder Years (ABC): Nostalgia, Comedy and the Black Experience
  • The Underground (Prime Video): Powerful, Visual American History Lesson
  • Invincible (Prime Video)
  • Wheel of Time (Prime Video): Definitely up there with Game of Thrones and Lord of the Rings
  • The White Lotus (HBO Max): I have never been so drawn into a show that made me laugh, cringe, drop my jaw, and so much more…Everything is not always what it seems…
  • Nine Perfect Strangers (Hulu): I do believe what happened actually took place in real life, which is pretty scary if it did…
  • Only Murders in the Building (Hulu)
  • Love Life (Season 2) (HBO Max): I LOVE #BLACKLOVE and ALL its many layers!
  • Queen Sugar (OWN Network): Another show that when it comes to a close, I will truly miss this show!! #DayOne
  • Arcane (Netflix): Definitely looking forward to the next season! Fun to watch!
  • The Falcon and Winter Soldier (Disney+): My fave of the Marvel series on Disney+ so far…They pulled out all kinds of surprises!!
  • What If…? (Disney+): Still missing Chadwick Boseman
  • Run the World (Starz): Love seeing Black female friendships and when cities become actors (I see you Harlem!)
  • Succession (HBO Max): All I can say is just watch it!!
  • Reservation Dogs (Hulu): Please more of this!!
  • Evil (Paramount+): Catholicism is a whole different beast (pun intended)
  • Blood and Water (Netflix): Had to represent SA!!
  • Cruel Summer (Hulu): Shout out to my sista-friend Lesley Bonner for this one!! Talk about being drawn in!! It’s all about the little details!
  • Soundtracks (Television and Film) (I did this instead to avoid having to narrow it down to one artist/group or album)
  • The Harder They Fall
  • Insecure (I owe a great deal to this soundtrack, I became aware and a fan of so many new artists because of each seasons soundtrack!!)
  • Judas and the Black Messiah
  • Coming 2 America
  • Cruella
  • BMF
  • Queen Sugar
  • Tom & Jerry (Now this one surprised me!! But trust me on this one!)
  • True Story (A Whole lot of Philly Soul)

*The listings are in no particular order.

Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., On the Desk...

It’s #WinterGraduation Time!!

Ahhhhh it’s that time of the year again! It’s a Saturday morning 8:30 am in Richmond, VA on the campus of Virginia Commonwealth University. The fall/winter season of graduation is upon us!! One thing I do like about VCU is that we have graduation twice a year, for those who finish in May and those that finish in December. December graduation this year was my first time participating in the entire school celebration at the Siegel Center here on the VCU campus. And this year was extra special as I had the awesome opportunity of hooding my former student and sister friend Dr. Lisa Winn Bryan!! Participating in this joyous moment is one that I will treasure for a lifetime. I remember when she asked me to take part in this incredible moment I had to make sure I was not dreaming, causing this is a serious thing. And what really got me was that morning as all the graduates are preparing for the big moment, Lisa walks in and sees me and she immediately begins to tear up and I had to fight back tears. That was the beginning of what would be one of the most rewarding days in my professorial career.

Just a few captured moments with my sister-friend Dr. Lisa Winn Bryan!!

Graduation is ALWAYS one of my favorite times of the year here at VCU and I get to celebrate it twice once in the spring and also in the fall. This momentous occasion is one that with each year will become more and more special. This is what happens when you become invested in your craft and the students who play a role in its shaping.

This semester has been about self-determination and perseverance for not just myself, but especially for my students. Each one of them in their own unique way has charted a path to success on their own terms. I say this every semester, but it warrants being mentioned being a professor/teacher is way more than providing weekly/daily lessons and educating the future…it’s about being a listening ear, parting growing wisdom/advice, showing support in-person and via Zoom, creating platforms for stories to be told, and as my Soror and the first president of National Association of Colored Women (NACW) Mary Church Terrell once said “lifting as we climb, onward and upward we go.” Graduation is the culmination of all the hard work that students take part in during their academic matriculation, and we as professors get to see the fruits of their labor flourish. I am always grateful that I get to change lives regardless of how big or small.

This change was specifically seen in my Capstone Senior Seminar course! I had the opportunity to mentor 7 AFAM seniors as they completed their senior thesis research projects. The topics ranged from the importance of Black motorcycle clubs in the Hampton Roads, to the issue of colorism for Black men, to the need for academic safe spaces, to better representation in comic books, to healing and processing Black mental health in Black matriarchal figures. And if their oral presentations were just an appetizer to their research papers….I cannot wait till the main course!! I am so proud of each of them and the work that they have done. Overcoming fears, sharing their personal stories, being vulnerable, and taking risks that will make them better scholars and people!!

A few of my students from my AFAM 499 course, “Capstone Seminar in Africana Studies” [Bottom picture l-r Angelica Williams, Alexa McNeil, Dr. Gipson, Nylah Kelly, and Winfred Walker]

Look out world, there’s a new set scholars entering and they have something to say!!

~Dr. G

Posted in Monthly Book Recommendations, Resources

Hispanic Heritage Month-Dr. G’s Bonus Book Recommendations

“We celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month to recognize the achievements and contributions of Hispanic American champions who have inspired others to achieve success.” ~National Hispanic Heritage Month/Library of Congress site

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15th-October 15th), I wanted to offer a bonus list of book recommendations particularly for youth!! Gotta make sure the kids get their list too!! You know Dr. G always has a special place for the youth!!

A phrase that always comes to mind and that will be forever ingrained is the notion that #RepresentationMatters!! Regardless of it is popular culture, school curriculums, hiring practices, and especially the materials that read, everyone should feel as though they can and are represented. As I have noted early on, reading has always been a powerful tool for change and great way to find peace and space/place to belong.

It is so necessary that Black and Brown children/youth are able to visually see their experiences drawn and written. Knowing that they can see themselves lets them know they have value within this world. What better way to do that than through a book!! Many of these stories, as well as others, pay tribute to the author’s cultural background, tell familial and community stories and also play a role in de-stigmatizing existing stereotypes and tropes. Additionally, this visual work can inspire, educate, and motivate the next generation!!

So here is a sample of great reads highlighting Afro/Hispanic/Latinx children to add to your literary collection/bookshelves:

Also, for more information about National Hispanic Heritage Month check out the following links:



~Dr. G

Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., Feature Spotlight, On The Radar

Inside Shang-Chi’s evolution from forgotten comic book character to big-screen superhero*

~Scottie Andrew, CNN Entertainment

Shang-Chi and The Legend of the Ten Rings First Reactions

So a couple a weeks ago I had the opportunity to offer a few of my thoughts about Asian representation in comic books and its relationship with the latest Marvel film, Shang-Chi and The Legend of the Ten Rings for CNN Entertainment!! To view the complete article see here.

Check out some of the snippets below:

Shang-Chi’s early issues relied on some problematic stereotypes

Every iteration of Shang-Chi has a similar throughline: He’s always a spectacular martial artist, always playing tug-of-war with his former life as a fighter and always, always tormented by daddy issues. That blueprint was created by Englehart and Jim Starlin, the two-man team who brought the character to life (Englehart, perhaps best known for his dark, noir take on Batman, has also created characters like Star-Lord of “Guardians of the Galaxy,” and Starlin is responsible for MCU icons like its biggest villain, Thanos.)

In the early 1970s, Englehart and Starlin approached Detective Comics (DC) with an idea: a comic book take on the David Carradine series “Kung Fu.” (The series has been criticized for its use of “yellowface,” or casting White actors as Asian characters. Carradine is White but starred as a part-Chinese martial artist.)Starlin, an artist, loved the martial arts element of the story, while writer Englehart said he was interested in delving into Taoism and other philosophies to flesh out his protagonist. The two thought they’d found a match with “Kung Fu” — but DC thought the “kung fu craze was going to disappear,” Starlin said, and passed on the idea.

So the pair took it next to Marvel, whose executives agreed only after insisting that the pair inject some pre-existing intellectual property into their comic, both men told CNN.

In this case, the company had the rights to the character Fu Manchu, a racist caricature of a Chinese man created by British author Sax Rohmer in the early 20th century. The villain was then “grafted onto the series” as Shang-Chi’s father, Starlin told CNN in an August interview. (Racist depictions of Asian characters had appeared in comics before this, like the egg-shaped villain “Egg Fu” in a 1965 Wonder Woman issue and the 1940 character “Ebony White” in the early comic, “The Spirit,” said Grace Gipson, an assistant professor at Virginia Commonwealth University who studies race and gender within comics.)

Gipson, a pop culture scholar who studies race and gender within comics, said hiring writers of color like Yang to helm series about characters of color is an improvement, but it “is really not a hard task.” She said while comics creators have made great strides in deconstructing norms of who a comic book reader is and what storylines they want to see, the hiring of creators of color needs to happen consistently.”It’s about making sure the voices of those being represented always have a seat at the table as well as a microphone to speak,” she told CNN.

Still, she said, as a fan of comics herself, she’s enjoyed seeing more representative stories being told in mainstream comics. 

*Repost from CNN

Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., Feature Spotlight

Chicago Humanities Festival Feature Q&A: “Dr. Grace D. Gipson’s Favorite Comic Book Characters”*

So your girl got a chance to share a few of her comic book faves with the Chicago Humanities Festival! Always love the chance to geek out and share!! Check it out below!!

*Original Post Feature from the Chicago Humanities Festival

Chicago Humanities Festival - Nonprofit Giving Platform | GiveGab

In May 2021 Black future feminist and pop culture scholar Dr. Grace D. Gipson was joined at Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF) by Bianca Xunise (Say Her Name) for a conversation about the past and future of comics.

After the program, we spoke to Dr. Gipson about some of her favorite comic book series, characters, and authors.

CHF: In your CHF program, you mentioned comic books and characters (like Dark Horse’s Martha Washington, who grew up in Chicago). Can you talk a little bit more about the history and significance of some of your favorite series, characters, and authors?

1) Storm (X-Men, Marvel Comics)

Gipson: When it comes to selecting my favorite comic book characters, I have a pretty solid line-up. While my introduction into comics was through the funny papers, there would be one character that truly drew me into the genre: Marvel Comics’s Storm from the X-Men.

As a Black woman who not only served as a leader of the X-Men, but also a goddess that controlled the weather elements, Storm as a fictional character provided an example of progressive representation and a fantastical escape.

Her presence in the comic book world made a significant impression on me as a young, Black girl from the Midwest. I was able to see myself, at the center and not on the fringes, within this popular medium that had been dominated primarily by white and male characters. Storm also opened the door for me to discover more Black female characters, as well as Black female comic book writers and artists.

2) Martha Washington (Dark Horse Comics)

Gipson: Another character who would have a significant impact on me personally and professionally is that of Dark Horse Comics’s Martha Washington. Created in the early 1990s, Martha Washington resonated with me in a very close way, considering her character was based in Chicago, IL. As a Champaign, IL native her story literally and figuratively felt close to home.

Martha Washington’s narrative as explored through The Life and Times of Martha Washington in the Twenty-First Century comic book series sought to showcase a “regular” relatable character that, despite her circumstances, becomes a heroine for her local community and ultimately the world.

Set in the urban space of the Cabrini-Green projects, Martha Washington’s beginnings (which are told in the first issue Give Me Liberty) explore, from a dystopian perspective, a current and relevant story of public housing, crime, poverty, Black youth, adulthood, womanhood, and even patriotism. Uniquely, her story offers a rare opportunity to explore American patriotism from a Black woman’s point of view. This is especially noteworthy considering the lack of Black female leads in comics, during the 1990s.

When it comes to comics, one can never underestimate the power of a diverse story and the impact it can have on all types of readers. These next two characters not only contribute diverse storylines but also have the impact of reaching a young audience. When looking at the landscape of comic book characters, most of them are adults, so it is refreshing to see a Black female youth presence.

3) Raquel “Rocket” Ervin (Milestone Comics)

Gipson: Raquel “Rocket” Ervin from Milestone Comics (a Black publishing company) is one of the earliest examples of a Black teen character that I have encountered. Also, Rocket’s storyline is one of the first comics to deal with complex and practical issues such as teen pregnancy, balancing motherhood, Black mentorship, and community access. And it was done in a way that avoided stereotypes, while providing hope.

As a character influenced by notable figures like Toni Morrison and W.E.B. Du Bois, Rocket provides an existing reality and a story of dedication and perseverance. Although she is deemed as a superhero, for Rocket her true superpower and strength is her ability to inspire.

4) RiRi “Ironheart” Williams (Marvel Comics)

Gipson: Another character that humanizes the Black girl experience is that of Marvel Comics RiRi “Ironheart” Williams. Through RiRi/Ironheart, as a fictional character, she personifies what it means to be a young, gifted, Black teen in today’s society. Her character also shares another look into the STEM world by encouraging Black girls to embrace one’s giftedness and intelligence.

This is a comic that I wish existed when I was a teenager, but nonetheless grateful that young Black girls and the world are able to appreciate it now. What is also significant about the Ironheart story is that it is written by a Black woman and Chicago-native, Eve L. Ewing, this is key as most stories in past comic book history have been written and drawn by white men (thankfully there is a growing landscape of representation).

To know that I am represented on the page and behind the panel inspires and further confirms that Black women and girls deserve to take up space in this popular medium. Ultimately, both Rocket and Ironheart are perfect examples of how comics can rewrite the script regarding Black girlhood and the importance of why “Representation Matters!!”

5) Torchy Brown (created by Jackie Ormes)

Gipson: Lastly, I felt it was important to not just recognize the importance of some of my favorite characters, but also one of my favorite writers/artists. Before there was even a Storm, Martha Washington, Rocket, or Ironheart there was a Black female lead named Torchy Brown created by cartoonist and writer Jackie Ormes. Similar to the Martha Washington character, Jackie Ormes legacy and work would find a home in Chicago.

As the first Black female cartoonist, Ormes was instrumental in resetting the standard in cartooning and comic strips. She did this by creating her own lane of telling stories that primarily featured Black voices, while also challenging the stereotypes and caricatures often presented in mainstream press. With readers from coast-to-coast, Ormes used her comic strip series and panels to discuss unapologetic commentary on such issues as racism, labor and taxes, U.S. Foreign policy, violence against women, unfair housing, segregated schools, and environmental injustice. She was able to use her talents to not only inform but also showcase (while entertain), in full color, the existence of intelligent, stylish and fashionable Black characters (particularly Black women). With Chicago as an honorary character, much of Ormes cartoon and comic strip work mirrored her real life as she was a community advocate and mentor, fundraiser, and trendsetter.

(Snapshot of a few of my faves!! Image Credit: Grace D. Gipson)

To check out the full feature, see here!!