Posted in Dr. G's Weekly Hot Topics, Feature Spotlight, On the Desk..., On The Radar, Resources

Dr. G’s Weekly Hot Topics

And we are back with some new hot features!! A lot is happening in the world, and I’m all for sharing with you!! Check out this week’s new hot topics!!

  • History Being Made!! An E-Sports degree is coming to a South Carolina HBCU!! With the popularity of gaming and e-sports on the rise, as a billion dollar industry, it is only fitting that HBCU’s pick up the baton and make their mark in this arena. Two years in the making Benedict College is offering a major in E-Sports (to go along with their already existing esports gaming room), making it the first HBCU to do so.
Photo Credit: Benedict College
  • Looking for a southern-inspired meal on your next Delta flight, starting September 1st Delta Airlines travelers leaving out of Atlanta will be able to enjoy a variety of dishes curated by a Black Woman Chef, Mashama Bailey. Chef Bailey is a James Beard Foundation award-winning chef and also serves as the co-founder and Executive Chef of The Grey in Savannah, Georgia.
Chef Mashama Bailey
Some of the dishes that will be featured on the in-flight menu (Photo Credit: Delta Air Lines)
  • Making your way to DC anytime soon?? Well make sure you visit the 15 new murals that are part of DC’s 15th anniversary celebration of MuralsDC art program. The first mural (seen below) can be found on the parking lot of the Chik-fil-A on Maryland Ave. in NE DC. More of the installations will be housed in the “Art Allery” an art gallery in an alley on H Street.
MuralsDC first 15th anniversary mural (Photo Credit: MuralsDC)
  • Gospel singer and civil rights activist Mahalia Jackson now has a dedicated public plaza named in here honor. Mahalia Jackson Court is an 8,500-square foot space housed on 1 E. 79th St. in Chatham, IL that will feature daily food trucks, music, curated art and a playscape for children. Visitors will also be able to check out a history display, which will feature various artifacts.
  • This past week it was announced that a prequel series revolving around the high profile Netflix show Bridgerton will showcase the glamorous and fierce Queen Charlotte just wrapped up production!! The show’s director Tom Verica announced it on his Twitter…
  • Imagining a Utopian Future for Queer Nigerians is a new idea being portrayed in Nigerian photographer Daniel Obasi’s latest book “Beautiful Resistance” an artistic collaboration with Louis Vuitton, which chronicles the LGBTQ+ experience in Lagos.
An image featured in Obasi’s newest book. (Photo credit: Daniel Obasi)
Posted in Holiday Celebration!!, On the Desk..., On The Radar, Resources

Plans for Juneteenth?? Let Me Offer a Few Things for you!!

As we prepare to celebrate the now federal holiday, Juneteenth, it is important that is not simply a day-off but a day of remembrance and liberation. And to get you in the spirit, I have compiled a few things to get you started!

Check it out below:

Film & Television/Podcasts

  • A Dream Delivered: The Lost Letters of Hawkins Wilson (Streaming on Paramount+ and PlutoTV)
  • ‘Sound of Freedom: A Juneteenth Celebration’ (ABC/Hulu) Friday-June 17th at 8 pm/ET
  • ‘Something in the Water Festival’ (Amazon Prime Video and Twitch) Friday-Sunday 3 pm/ET
  • ‘After Jackie’ (History Channel) Saturday-June 18 at 8 pm/ET
  • ‘Juneteenth: A Global Celebration’ (CNN) Sunday-June 19th at 8 pm/ET
  • ‘Omitted : The Black Cowboy’ (ESPN 2) Sunday-June 19th at 2 pm/ET
  • Emergency (2022) [Amazon Prime Video]
  • High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America- Episode #4-“Freedom” (2021) [Netflix]
  • Miss Juneteenth (2020)
  • Juneteenth Jamboree: A Place For Families (2016) [PBS]
  • Juneteenth: Why Our Day of Jubilation Matters [Conversations with Beloved & Kindred-Auburn Avenue Research Library]
Photo by Max Vakhtbovych on Pexels.com

Cookbooks

  • Watermelon and Red Birds: A Cookbook for Juneteenth and Black Celebrations ~Nicole A. Taylor
  • Everyone’s Table: Global Recipes for Modern Health ~Gregory Gourdet
  • Vibration Cooking ~Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor
  • Sweet Home Café Cookbook: A Celebration of African American Cooking ~Albert Lukas, Jessica B. Harris, Jerome Grant, NMAAHC
  • Spoonbread and Strawberry Wine ~Norma Jean and Carole Darden
  • The Cooking Gene ~Michael Twitty
Photo by Ronmar Lacamiento on Pexels.com

Resource Guides

President Joe Biden talks with Opal Lee after signing the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act Bill, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the East Room of the White House. (Official White House Photo by Chandler West)
Posted in Feature Spotlight, Monthly Book Recommendations, On the Desk..., On The Radar, Resources

Dr. G’s Monthly Book Recommendations-May 2022

Photo by Rovelyn Camato on Pexels.com

So we are almost half way through 2022, but the reading doesn’t stop. Before I get you ready for your summer reading, just want to finish out the spring with some breezy balcony and patio reading. This month’s list is all over the globe…literally, I figured I would share a few treats by giving you some historical references, a little bit of self-preservation and cultural identity, mixed with a dash of U.S. midwest and Caribbean roots, and topping you off with some sassy satire.

  • Jameela Green Ruins Everything ~Zarqa Nawaz
  • Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations ~Mira Jacob
  • Olga Dies Dreaming: A Novel ~Xochitl Gonzalez
  • The Other Madisons: The Lost History of a President’s Black Family ~Bettye Kearse
  • American Street ~Ibi Zoboi

And remember you can always go back and check out the previous month’s list and past recommendations in the “Resource” section of the website!!

We write because we believe the human spirit cannot be tamed and should not be trained. ~Nikki Giovanni

Posted in Monthly Book Recommendations, On the Desk..., Resources

Dr. G’s Monthly Book Recommendations- April 2022

Photo by alex ohan on Pexels.com

With Spring comes comes rain, flowers in bloom, warm and light, embracing the sense of freshness that abounds, and a time to begin anew! What better way to do that than with a couple of good reads!!

Check them out below:

  • Take My Hand ~Dolen Perkins-Valdez
  • Bless The Daughter Raised By A Voice In Her Head ~Warsan Shire
  • A Girl is a Body of Water ~Jennifer Nansubuga Maxumbi
  • By The Book ~Jasmine Guillory
  • The Windows of Malabar Hill ~Sujata Massey

And remember you can always go back and check out the previous month’s list and past recommendations in the “Resource” section of the website!!

“I began writing about power because I had so little.” ~Octavia E. Butler

Posted in Feature Spotlight, On The Radar, Resources

Mmmm Good!!…Celebrating Black History Through Tasty Drinks & Delicious Eats!!

To All My Chefs & Mixologists (novice and professional) out there, this is for you!

Who doesn’t love a mouth-watering, soulful meal or a delightful spirit to cap off the night?!! Well I wanted to add to your “must-see and must-try” lists by highlighting the spirit and culinary world with a few cookbooks, wineries, breweries, creators and organizations that are making Black History!!

Not surprisingly, Black Americans have contributed significantly (and still do) to the culinary world and cocktail/wine/brewery culture. We have been tastemakers and drink-makers since the beginning of time :-). Cooking and feeding the soul is in the DNA of African Americans (check out Netflix’s High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America if you don’t believe me)!

As it relates to the spirit world, I recently learned that there was a Black Mixology Club that was founded in 1898 by R. R. Bowie and J. Burke Edelin that was a “marquee professional association,” and a gathering place for African Americans who were trying to move up the ladder of social mobility within professional bartending [Check out these pioneers as well: Cato Alexander, John Dabney, Tom Bullock, and Dick “Uncle Dick” Francis]. 

Now let me say this…. the following below is by no means the only folks that have been and are in the game just a few to wet your palette (literally and figuratively), because I know there are tons of Black folks making history!!

So get ready to pop some bottles, plan your next couple or friends getaway, pull out those pots and pans, turn on your ovens, and make some magical memories!!

Black Winemakers, Wines, and Sommeliers

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is pexels-photo-5050190-1.jpeg
Photo by Ketut Subiyanto on Pexels.com

Black Breweries & Cideries

Photo by ELEVATE on Pexels.com

Recipe, Cocktails, and other Cookbooks

  • Black Mixcellence: A Comprehensive Guide to Black Mixology ~Tamika Hall
  • Tiki: Modern Tropical Cocktails ~Shannon Mustipher
  • The Ideal Bartender* ~Tom Bullock [First cocktail book by an African American]
  • Holy Spirits! Charleston Culture Through Cocktails ~Taneka Reaves & Johnny Caldwell
  • After Hours Cocktail Book ~Martina Jackson
  • My America: Recipes from a Young Black Chef ~Kwame Onwuachi
  • Black Food: Stories, Art, and Recipes from Across the African Diaspora ~Bryant Terry
  • The Art of Fufu: A Guide to the Culture and Flavors of a West African Tradition ~Kavachi Ukegbu
  • Black Girl Baking: Wholesome Recipes Inspired by a Soulful Upbringing ~Jerrelle Guy
  • The Church Ladies’ Divine Desserts ~Brenda Rhodes Miller
  • Soul Food Love: Healthy Recipes Inspired by One Hundred Years of Cooking in a Black Family ~Alice Randall & Caroline Randall Williams
  • In Pursuit of Flavor ~Edna Lewis
  • Between Harlem and Heaven: Afro-Asian-American Cooking for Big Nights, Weeknights, and Every Day ~Alexander Smalls and JJ Johnson
  • Son of a Southern Chef: Cook with Soul ~Lazarus Lynch
  • The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African American Culinary History in the Old South ~Michael W. Twitty
Photo by DapurMelodi on Pexels.com

Cheers and Bon Appetit!!

Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., Resources

“Black Futures Matter”- Afrofuturism 101 Reading & Movie List

So recently I have had many people ask what would I recommend as an introduction into Afrofuturism. This is something that I am always talking about, teaching, and or even consuming for myself, so why not have a list for beginners! And voila…I compiled various books, short stories, comic books, graphic novels, children and YA fiction, and movies that offer a unique look into Afrofuturism.

Books

  • Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture ~Ytasha Womack
  • Afrofuturism 2.0: The Rise of Astro-Blackness ~Edited by Reynaldo Anderson & Charles E. Jones
  • Beloved ~Toni Morrison
  • Kindred ~Octavia Butler
  • Wild Seed ~Octavia Butler
  • Brown Girl in the Ring ~Nalo Hopkinson
  • The Conductors ~Nicole Glover
  • How Long ‘Til Black Future Month? ~N.K. Jemisin
  • Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora ~Edited by Sheree Thomas
  • Dark Matter: Reading the Bones ~Edited by Sheree Thomas
  • Black No More: Being an Account of the Strange and Wonderful Working of Science in the Land of the Free ~George Schuyler
  • Lion’s Blood ~Steven Barnes
  • Zulu Heart ~Steven Barnes
  • Black Leopard, Red Wolf ~Marlon James
  • Minions: A Vampire Huntress Legend ~L.A. Banks
  • Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements ~Edited by Walidah Imarisha & adrienne maree brown 
  • Black Kirby: In Search of the MotherBoxx Connection ~John Jennings & Stacey Robinson 
  • Mothership Tales: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond ~Edited by Bill Campbell & Edward Austin Hall

Short Stories/Lecture

  • “The Princess Steel” & “The Comet” ~W.E.B. Du Bois
  • “Caramelle 1864” ~Jewelle Gomez
  • “I Left My Heart in Skaftafell” ~Victor LaValle
  • “Don’t Go There” ~Tracy Cross
  • “Ain’t I a Woman” ~Sojourner Truth

Comic Books/Graphic Novels

  • Matty’s Rocket and Infinitude: An Afrofuturist Tale ~Tim Fielder
  • Far Sector (DC Comics) ~N.K. Jemisin
  • Eve (Boom! Studios) ~Victor LaValle
  • Hardware, Blood Syndicate, Static (Milestone Media)
  • Livewire (Valiant Comics)
  • Ironheart (Marvel Comics)
  • Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur (Marvel Comics)

Children/YA Fiction

  • Bayou Magic ~Jewel Parker Rhodes
  • Malice in Ovenland ~Micheline Hess
  • Ikenga and Shuri: A Black Panther Novel ~Nnedi Okorafor
  • Raybearer ~Jordan Ifueko
  • Children of Blood and Bone and Children of Virtue and Vengeance ~Tomi Adeyemi
  • The Gilded Ones ~Namina Forna

Movies

  • Space is the Place (1974)
  • The Wiz (1978)
  • Black Panther (2018)
  • Hidden Figures (2016)
  • Get Out (2017)
  • Us (2019)
  • Antebellum (2020)
  • Sorry to Bother You (2018)
  • Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018)
  • See You Yesterday (2019)
  • District 9 (2009)

Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., Holiday Celebration!!, On The Radar, Resources

“You Get Me!!” Corporate Businesses Nailing Black History Month!!

Going into Black History Month every year I’m always mixed with emotions. On one hand it’s an exciting time to highlight the experiences of Black people, but then I am suddenly on edge seeing what things are specifically set to come out in February because its Black History Month. As I have said many times before this celebratory effort is one that happens 365-24/7, especially considering I am a professor in an African American Studies department.

Nevertheless, I must say things are getting better and the efforts made from various organizations/corporations are evolving (despite ones who still miss the mark). And because “sharing is caring” I wanted to make sure I highlighted a few businesses that are putting in the work and who really get me!! Check them out below:

  • Target: One of my favorite brands and a place where I do not mind spending my coins is Target. They have been consistently spotlighting black talent and not just in February!! In its eighth year, Target presents “Black Beyond Measure,” which includes a limited-time assortment of apparel, accessories and home goods designed by Black creators along with highlighting Black-owned brands sold at the retailer.
NEW @ TARGET * BLACK HISTORY MONTH - YouTube
Photo credit: Target YouTube
  • Old Navy: The clothing brand has partnered with three talented Black artists — Temi Coker, Lo Harris and Destiny Darcel — to create Project WE t-shirts centered around their love for the Black community and culture. Project WE is a collaboration between diverse artists and includes a donation of $1 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of America in support of youth arts programs. They are also donating $50,000 to support the 15% Pledge, a growing platform that calls on major retailers to commit a minimum of 15% of their shelf space to Black-owned businesses.
Check Out Old Navy's Black History Month Tees | POPSUGAR Fashion
Black creatives (l-r) Temi Coker, Lo Harris and Destiny Darcel
  • Amazon Launchpad: This program is celebrating Black innovators and the stories behind their businesses throughout Black History Month by highlighting an array of brands on its various platforms.
Amazon.com: Amazon Launchpad: Celebrate Black History Month
  • Nordstrom: For 2022, Nordstrom is celebrating Black History Month through a variety of initiatives everything from spotlighting Black-founded brands to celebrating culture through personal stories. They will also honor Black food culture by featuring recipes by Spice Suite founder Angel Gregorio at the store’s specialty coffee bars. Additionally, the retailer has committed to increasing Black and Latino representation among its managers by at least 50%, delivering $500 million in retail sales from Black and/or Latino-owned brands and increasing charitable donations to organizations that promote anti-racism to $1 million every year by 2025.
Nordstrom Rack: Shop Clothes, Shoes, Jewelry, Beauty and Home
  • Peloton: Through uplift, celebration and empowerment Peloton is highlighting the “magnetic energy of the Black diaspora that breaks boundaries and moves us forward.” This is done through themed classes, special artist series, and for a third year they launched a special apparel line featuring the work of designer Erwin Hines. Peloton will also mark Black History Month with a charitable contribution of $100,000 – to support the development of a community wellness center in Chicago’s South Side. They are partnering with Claretian Associates, an organization with deep ties to the neighborhood.
Peloton Has Released A New Apparel Collection In Celebration Of Black  History Month - 29Secrets
Peloton’s new Black History Month apparel line
  • Victoria’s Secret PINK: The beauty and fashion brand has partnered with We The Urban founder Willie Greene to release an exclusive “Pink x We The Urban” gender-free one-size tee (this has been an annual effort). In addition, PINK is donating $50,000 to the Black and Pink organization that is dedicated to transforming the lives of system-impacted LGBTQIA2S+ people and people living with HIV/AIDS.
WE THE URBAN
  • Apple: The tech giant is spotlighting Black business and innovation while also amplifying Black voices through a multitude of its platforms and specially curated collections. Some of these include, Apple Maps where users can learn about Black history or discover Black-owned businesses through curated Guides; their Shot on iPhone campaign, “Our Stories,” features portraits and video of four pioneers who are at the nexus of Black history The company also launched a special edition Apple Watch “Black Unity Braided Solo Loop” watch that features matching unity lights on the face of the watch. It gets its inspiration from the “Afrofuturism,” framework, which explores the Black and African diasporic experience through a narrative of science, technology and self-empowerment.
Apple spotlights Black voices during Black History Month - Apple
Apple’s 2022 Black History Month theme

These businesses get me!!

What I can also really appreciate about these businesses is that many if not all have year-round efforts, and are making sure Black creatives and talents are getting their shine!! It’s really important that you do more than just sign a check (no complaints here), but that you make a full on investment of the talent!!

Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., On The Radar, Resources

Black History Month 2022!!

2-2-22

It is that time of the year!! And while I personally see Black History Month as an everyday conversation, I understand that for some this is not the case. With that being said, Happy Black History Month to you all!!

The celebration of Black History Month is a great time for the nation and the world to expand on the many contributions of the Black/African American experience. Established in 1926 by historian Carter G. Woodson as “Negro History” week , Woodson wanted to make sure people understood not only the experiences but also provide an opportunity to focus on particular themes. The legacy of Negro History week, according to Woodson, was never meant “to dictate or limit the exploration of the Black experience, but to bring to the public’s attention important developments that merit emphasis.” Thus, The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) an organization created by Woodson would begin to explore Black History through a yearly theme. The first theme came about in 1928 and it centered around the idea of “Civilization: A World Achievement.” This year’s theme is the importance of “Black Health and Wellness”!

This theme acknowledges the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g., birthworkers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora. 

With this year’s theme centered on “Black Health and Wellness” (For more information about this click here!) I wanted to provide some tips and resources on making sure you are taking care of the best YOU!!

Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com
  • Be Kind To Yourself
  • Exercise…Get an accountability partner or even join a group
  • Keep your body hydrated
  • Incorporate smoothies into your diet
  • Take in nature…It is a great remedy for alleviating stress
  • Start a gratitude journal
  • Make sure to plenty of sleep…To go back to those naps that we took during kindergarten
  • Meditate…whether its 5 minutes or 30 minutes, make sure to give your brain a break
  • Spend time with family and friends!!
  • Check out these podcasts: Therapy for Black Girls, Peace of Mind with Taraji, Black Mental Health Podcast, Black Mental Matters, The Friend Zone, Minding My Black Business, Talking Off The Couch, AFFIRM, Getting Grown (just to name a few)
  • Host a potluck or tapas-style gathering where you focus on a specific cuisine
  • Don’t forget to smile and laugh routinely!!
  • Do something for others just because you can.
  • Tap into your spiritual side
  • Incorporate a daily affirmations routine
  • Try to be spontaneous or try something new each week.
  • Your Boundaries Matter!
  • Soak in some Sunlight and Vitamin D
  • Cultivate a positive mindset
  • Always Invest in Your Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health

Additional books and resources highlighting Black Health and Wellness, click here!

While there is an official celebration of Black History know that this is a 365-24/7 effort for me!!

Photo by Bekka Mongeau on Pexels.com
Posted in A Professor's Thoughts..., On the Desk..., Resources

Dr. G’s ‘Top 21’ Books of 2021

Did I mention I love to read…Well I DO!! Ever since I was kid I always had a book to read. Even as I hit 40 this year, I made sure I had my share of reading done. Matter fact this year I even did a Reading Challenge (on Good Reads) where I had to read at one book a month. And as I type this post I managed to get in 15 books plus a few comic books and graphic novels. It felt good to turn the pages (old school reader) of each new book and then look up what my next read would be!!

With all that said, I figure I would keep up with my tradition from last year and compile my ‘Top 21’ books from this year, and as an extra bonus for me I even got to meet some of the authors!! Pretty cool!!

Nothing like sharing some of your faves!! As I always say, ‘sharing is caring.’

So in no particular order, here is my Top 21 List of Books for 2021!!

  1. Just As I Am ~Cicely Tyson
  2. Somebody’s Daughter ~Ashley C. Ford
  3. Unspeakable: The Tulsa Race Massacre ~Carole Boston Weatherford
  4. Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer’s Enduring Message to America ~Keisha N. Blain
  5. Luster ~Raven Leilani
  6. Black Leopard, Red Wolf: The Dark Star Trilogy ~Marlon James
  7. Digital Black Feminism ~Catherine Knight Steele
  8. Maya and the Robot ~Eve L. Ewing
  9. The Black Flamingo ~Dean Atta
  10. Fast Pitch ~Nic Stone
  11. Bamboozled by Jesus: How God Tricked Me into The Life of My Dreams ~Yvonne Orji
  12. The Day the Klan Came to Town ~Bill Campbell
  13. Black Boy Joy: 17 Stories Celebrating Black Boyhood ~Edited by Kwame Mbalia
  14. Chronicling Stankonia: The Rise of the Hip-Hop South ~Regina N. Bradley
  15. The Book of Unknown Americans ~Cristina Henriquez
  16. The 1619 Project ~Nikole Hannah-Jones
  17. The 1619 Project: Born on the Water ~Nikole Hannah-Jones & Renée Watson
  18. Stella’s Stellar Hair ~Yesenia Moises
  19. How the Word Is Passed A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America ~Clint Smith
  20. Libertie ~Kaitlyn Greenidge
  21. Raybearer ~Jordan Ifueko

Happy Reading!!

~Dr. G

Posted in On The Radar, Resources

Call For Papers-AAIHS 2022 Conference

**REPOST FROM AAIHS SITE**

The African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS)’s

Seventh Annual Conference

Everyday Practices, Memory Making, and Local Spaces

March 11-12, 2022 

A Virtual Conference 
Host: University of Nevada, Las Vegas 
Group of Black Lives Matters protesters in front of Sir Winston Churchill Monument statue in London (Sandor Szmutko / Shutterstock.com)

The process of “memory making” is ongoing as activists throughout the African diaspora confront the past and challenge landscapes that pay homage to colonialism and Eurocentrism. Recent debates surrounding the teaching of Critical Race Theory in K-12 classrooms, The 1619 Project, and the position of Confederate monuments in the public square highlight these contemporary trends. The United States is facing a unique moment of national reckoning that scrutinizes how history is interpreted, commemorated, and displayed. 

In the era of social media, local issues can also have immediate global implications. When Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd in the Summer of 2020, protests emerged in cities and towns throughout the United States. But calls for justice and civil rights quickly spread across the globe, as communities throughout Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Americas condemned anti-Blackness, police brutality, and systemic racism in their own countries. Relatedly, as activists in the United States toppled Confederate monuments and statues of Christopher Columbus last year, people of African descent in Europe also challenged the colonial landscapes displayed in various European cities. In Bristol, for example, activists defaced and destroyed the statues of slave traders such as Edward Colston and in Belgium, activists toppled statues of brutal imperialists such as Leopold II. These national and global activist movements contested the aftermath of enslavement and colonialism in the everyday while also illustrating how memory shapes politics, identities, and communities in the past and present.  

In accordance with this contemporary moment, this year’s theme, “Everyday Practices, Memory Making, and Local Spaces” provides an opportunity for interdisciplinary scholarship that examines how history is told in local, national, and international contexts. Correspondingly, AAIHS has selected Las Vegas, Nevada, for its annual conference. The city’s African American residents are deeply tied to national, international, and local histories. As southern Nevada’s Black population grew through the Great Migration, civil rights activists fought against the city’s rampant inequality, culminating in the “Moulin Rouge Agreement” on March 26, 1960, that desegregated the Strip casinos. And as an international tourism hub, spaces throughout southern Nevada have been shaped and reshaped by transnational influences. 

As panelists consider their proposals, they might consider the following questions: How do “everyday practices” form conceptions of the past? How is memory “made” and “remade” in different eras of history? How can “local spaces” influence broader discussions of societal injustice and prompt calls for social change? What methods have people from past and present generations used in their “memory making” and why did they use those methods? In what way does gender, sexuality, race, and class complicate memory making in everyday locales? Ultimately, what are the stakes of challenging memorialized and deeply invested in spaces and stories in local, national, and international settings?

AAIHS welcomes individual proposals for abbreviated presentations (5-6 minutes) that consider the theme of “Everyday Practices, Memory Making, and Local Spaces” from a variety of perspectives. Each proposal will be considered for inclusion in one of the featured conference sessions, which will be scheduled remotely on Friday, March 11 or Saturday, March 12, 2022. AAIHS invites scholars at various ranks and affiliations (from graduate students to senior faculty and independent scholars) to submit proposals for consideration. Each proposal should include a title and approximately 500 words that clearly explains the paper’s argument; methods and methodologies; interventions; and engagement with the conference theme. Submissions should also include a short CV (1-3 pages in length), highlighting previous publications and presentations, if applicable. Proposals will be accepted on the AAIHS website between September 15, 2021 and November 15, 2021. 

To Submit a Conference Proposal, click here!!

Conference Planning Committee:

  • Chair: Tyler D. ParryUniversity of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Hilary N. GreenUniversity of Alabama
  • Tiffany N. FlorvilUniversity of New Mexico 
  • Candace CunninghamFlorida Atlantic University 
  • Adam McNeilRutgers University, New Brunswick

*Please email conference@aaihs.org to reach the conference committee.