Posted in Monthly Book Recommendations, Resources

Dr. G’s May 2021-Book Recommendations

They say April showers bring May flowers, well in this case the flowers are books!! 😉 See what’s blooming this month, and check out the recommendations below:

  • Summer on the Bluffs ~Sunny Hostin
  • Sure, I’ll Be Your Black Friend: Notes from the Other Side of the Fist Bump ~Ben Philipe
  • Somebody’s Daughter: A Memoir ~Ashley C. Ford
  • When Stars Rain Down ~Angela Jackson-Brown
  • Black Leopard, Red Wolf ~Marlon James

Remember you can always go back and check out the previous month’s recommendations in the “Resource” section of the website!!

Till next month!!

~Dr. G

Posted in Monthly Book Recommendations, Resources

Dr. G’s April 2021-Book Recommendations

With Spring in full effect, I also got another list of books to add to your library!! See this month’s recommendations below:

And remember you can always go back and check out the previous month’s recommendations in the “Resource” section of the website!

Till next month!!

~Dr. G

Posted in Feature Spotlight, Resources

Feature Spotlight- “Jaya’s Pop Culture Minute”

Before March ends I had to make sure you got your monthly feature from Black Future Feminist Intern Jaya!! Not only do we have a new feature, but it will be housed under a new name, Jaya’s Pop Culture Minute!!

This month Jaya is offering a commentary on the Amazon Studios film, One Night in Miami (2020). Check it out below:

Although One Night in Miami is based on various moments (with fictional dialogue) between  singer Sam Cooke, civil rights activist Malcolm X, boxer Cassius Clay, and football star Jim Brown, during an actual event the film somehow balanced out these large historical figures so that audiences can visualize them as real people. Most times when discussing Malcom X we only see him as a huge pivotal figure, but rarely as confidant, friend, or father. In this movie, each figure is presented in a more digestible manner. Additionally, this movie has an inviting feel that draws you into this filmic story. Simply put, this movie gives new meaning to the bonds of friendship, and how one night together can open new wounds, while mending old ones. Through the many conversations, we see how each of these men bring us into their deep dialogue, while also exposing audiences to the struggles of that time. While each of the men saw themselves as brothers and friends, like family and friends they had their disagreements, mainly around civil rights, but managed to understand and ultimately respect their differences. Even though the film delivers a lighthearted feel, it also shows moments when you are snapped back into reality. In particular, we see this in Malcolm’s uneasiness and concern with being followed and the constant feeling that a wave of death is in the air. 

Overall, this movie shined a fresh new light and a more human side to these important, complex historical figures. Even the performances from the actors were spot on from their dialect to small details, which only enhanced the movie. The conflicts between characters are perfectly done. Additionally, the cinematography adds another layer of greatness from the bird’s eye view of the boxing match, to seeing Sam pull you in with his melodic voice, and Jim Brown in the viewfinder.

For a directorial debut, from Regina King, this is an amazing movie! Moreover, the idea of seeing these figures act normal and interact with each other during their last days is something that will leave your heart hurting. In the end, each actor’s performance will leave you breathless and wanting more!!

You will be able to find Jaya’s monthly features as well as other engaging and fun content in the “Resources” section of the site!!

One Night in Miami (2021)
Cast members (l-r) Sam Cooke [Leslie Odom, Jr.]; Jim Brown [Aldis Hodge]; Malcolm X [Kingsley Ben-Adir]; and Muhammad Ali [Eli Goree]

Jaya’s PCM Rating: 3.5 /5 Stars

Posted in On The Radar, Resources

Internship Opportunity

2021 Black Perspectives Summer Editorial Internship Program

Calling all Graduate Students and Rising Seniors!!

So I am all about sharing opportunities that not only provide meaningful experiences (personally and professionally), but can also build one’s network!!

Black Perspectives, the award-winning blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS), is currently accepting applications for our summer editorial internship program. The internship, which begins on June 1st and ends on August 31st, is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students (rising seniors only).

I can personally co-sign on this great opportunity, as I served as Summer Editorial Intern while in my doctoral program. After participating in this program, I would quickly move up in the ranks becoming an Editorial Assistant, then to Assistant Editor for Black Perspectives and currently serving as secretary for the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS).

So for those that may be interested, here is some more information about the internship program.

About the Internship

Interns will work closely with the blog editors on a part-time basis during the summer months and receive practical experience in academic blogging. Each intern will contribute to the publication of the blog in a variety of aspects including research, copy-editing, fact checking, formatting and publicity (via social media). Interns will receive a stipend and a complimentary one-year membership in AAIHS. The internship is virtual, which means that interns only need access to a computer and internet.

The 3-month internship also offers young scholars an opportunity to sharpen their writing skills and receive personalized feedback on their writing. It provides interns with access to a diverse network of early career bloggers (and professors), and the opportunity to publish their pieces on a popular academic blog.

Qualifications

  • Currently enrolled in an accredited academic institution; graduate students (PhD and MA students) and advanced undergraduate students (rising seniors only).
  • Preference will be given to candidates who major/specialize in History and/or African American Studies. However, we welcome applications from candidates in a variety of fields including English, Journalism, Political Science, Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies, International Relations and America Studies.
  • Must be motivated, detailed-oriented, and possess strong writing skills.
  • Must have a strong knowledge base and keen interest in Black thought, history and culture.
  • Must have an interest in public writing and social media.
  • Must be interested in working with a diverse group of scholars who are passionate about Black thought, history, and culture.
  • Must be willing to devote approximately 5 hours per week to assisting with the blog; and be willing to attend mandatory training sessions online (scheduled to take place in mid-to-late May).

Application Materials Needed

  • A cover letter (please introduce yourself; explain why you’re interested in this opportunity; and highlight relevant skills and experience that make you an ideal candidate for the internship).
  • A CV/Resume
  • 5-10 page writing sample
  • One recommendation letter from a professor/mentor. Applicants must arrange to have one recommendation letter submitted via email (editors@aaihs.org) no later than April 1, 2021. 

The application deadline is April 1, 2021 (11:59PM EST)

For additional information and where to apply, go here !! And please feel free to share with your networks!!

Photo by Laker on Pexels.com
Posted in Monthly Book Recommendations, Resources

Dr. G’s March 2021-Book Recommendations

And just like that, March is here and I have another set of book recommendations on deck! See this month’s list below:

And remember you can always go back and check out the previous month’s recommendations in the “Resource” section of the website!

~Dr. G

Posted in On The Radar, Resources

Internship Opportunity

2021 Black Perspectives Summer Editorial Internship Program

Calling all Graduate Students and Rising Seniors!!

So I am all about sharing opportunities that not only provide meaningful experiences (personally and professionally, but can also build one’s network!!

Black Perspectives, the award-winning blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS), is currently accepting applications for our summer editorial internship program. The internship, which begins on June 1st and ends on August 31st, is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students (rising seniors only).

I can personally co-sign on this great opportunity, as I served as Summer Editorial Intern while in my doctoral program. After participating in this program, I would quickly move up in the ranks becoming an Editorial Assistant, then to Assistant Editor for Black Perspectives and currently serving as secretary for the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS).

So for those that may be interested, here is some more information about the internship program.

About the Internship

Interns will work closely with the blog editors on a part-time basis during the summer months and receive practical experience in academic blogging. Each intern will contribute to the publication of the blog in a variety of aspects including research, copy-editing, fact checking, formatting and publicity (via social media). Interns will receive a stipend and a complimentary one-year membership in AAIHS. The internship is virtual, which means that interns only need access to a computer and internet.

The 3-month internship also offers young scholars an opportunity to sharpen their writing skills and receive personalized feedback on their writing. It provides interns with access to a diverse network of early career bloggers (and professors), and the opportunity to publish their pieces on a popular academic blog.

Qualifications

  • Currently enrolled in an accredited academic institution; graduate students (PhD and MA students) and advanced undergraduate students (rising seniors only).
  • Preference will be given to candidates who major/specialize in History and/or African American Studies. However, we welcome applications from candidates in a variety of fields including English, Journalism, Political Science, Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies, International Relations and America Studies.
  • Must be motivated, detailed-oriented, and possess strong writing skills.
  • Must have a strong knowledge base and keen interest in Black thought, history and culture.
  • Must have an interest in public writing and social media.
  • Must be interested in working with a diverse group of scholars who are passionate about Black thought, history, and culture.
  • Must be willing to devote approximately 5 hours per week to assisting with the blog; and be willing to attend mandatory training sessions online (scheduled to take place in mid-to-late May).

Application Materials Needed

  • A cover letter (please introduce yourself; explain why you’re interested in this opportunity; and highlight relevant skills and experience that make you an ideal candidate for the internship).
  • A CV/Resume
  • 5-10 page writing sample
  • One recommendation letter from a professor/mentor. Applicants must arrange to have one recommendation letter submitted via email (editors@aaihs.org) no later than April 1, 2021. 

The application deadline is April 1, 2021 (11:59PM EST)

For additional information and where to apply, go here !! And please feel free to share with your networks!!

Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels.com
Posted in Monthly Book Recommendations, Resources

Dr. G’s February 2021-Book Recommendations

When I tell you I love to read that is really an understatement! Outside of traveling and going to the movies, I have always loved picking up a book and getting my reading fix. I remember as a kid participating in reading challenges in school and at the local library, going to the Scholastic Book fair, and Now my fondest memory when it comes to reading was the Pizza Hut Book-It program, collecting those 5 golden stars was the key to many dinners that included a personal pan pizza. (All Cheese for me!!) What a cool way to encourage reading! And for many of my friends it “low-key” became a competition to not only see who could read the most, but also who could collect the most pizza coupons. One thing was for sure, my mama and grandma did not have to worry about whether I was into reading!

Image result for pizza hut book it
Old School “Book It” pin

The importance of reading has always and continues to be a regular topic of conversation and discussion, especially in the K-12 school system. We are at a point, where you can literally access a book or magazine via your phone, tablet, iPad, laptop, and of course old school physical book. And even though there are many avenues for reading books these days (Kindle, Audible, AudioBooks Now, Downpour, Apple Audio Books, Scribd, Libro.fm, and many more) it is nothing like having the hard, physical copy. For me it’s all about being able to turn the page, fold the corners, write in the date/year when I got it, and using a creative, colorful bookmark.

But I could go on and on about my love of books and reading!! As a result of this bibliophilia, I wanted to make sure that I shared with you on a monthly basis some book recommendations. Each month I will share my top 5 books to read and/or add to your library. These books will range from memoirs, to academic research books, to graphic novels, and much more. Each month will be a new surprise!! So without further ado here is my February 2021 Book Recommendations:

And if you missed January’s recommendation you can check out the list in the “Resource” section of the website!

~Dr. G

Posted in Resources

Let’s Talk About Race-Black Lives Matter

Previously Posted on Happy Mama Happy Mini (June 2020)

Over the past few months, we have been struggling through a global pandemic—one that has disproportionately affected Black and Brown communities—while also trying to find some sense of comfort and happiness. However, we as country and even the world have recently witnessed a national outpouring of anger, frustration, passion, and protests in response to the ongoing pain of racial injustice and police brutality. With the recent national attention regarding the killings of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and George Floyd, it is essential to create dialogues about these events and how we make meaning of them to invest in a better society. 

As stated by Black feminist and civil rights activist Audre Lorde, “It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences.” Thus, as we continue to have discussion in our schools, churches, community events, and our homes it is important that we engage in these differences, while simultaneously equipping ourselves and others. Having the knowledge can lead to fruitful conversation and some sort of change. 

This knowledge can be found in a variety of resources, tools, books, films/documentaries, and community efforts. 

Below you will see a guide that seeks to equip us with the knowledge in hopes to bring about change: 

Multimedia

Graphic Novels/YA/Children’s Books

  • Dear Martin (2017) ~Nic Stone
  • The Poet X (2018) ~Elizabeth Acevedo
  • Bayou (2009) ~Jeremy Love
  • Something Happened in Our Town: A Child’s Story About Racial Injustice (2018) ~Marianne Celano, Marietta Collins,and Ann Hazzard
  • Saturday (2019) ~Oge Mara
  • The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a Young Civil Rights Activist (2017) ~Cynthia Levinson
  • Each Kindness (2012) ~Jacqueline Woodson
  • “Resist: 35 Profiles of Ordinary People Who Rose Up Against Tyranny and Injustice” (2018) ~Veronica Chambers
  • Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You (2020) ~Jason Reynolds & Ibram X. Kendi
  • Parable of the Sower: A Graphic Novel Adaptation (2020) ~Damian Duffy & John Jennings
  • March [Trilogy] (2016) ~John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell
  • The Hate U Give (2017) ~Angie Thomas
  • ‘Still I Rise: A Graphic History of African Americans’ ~Roland Laird w/Taneshia Nash
  • Skin Like Mine (2016) ~LaTashia M. Perry
  • I Am Enough (2018) ~Grace Byers
  • Hair Love (2019) ~Matthew Cherry
  • Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History (2017) & Little Legends: Exceptional Men in Black History (2019) ~Vashti Harrison

Films/Documentaries

  • I Am Not Your Negro (2016)
  • Race (2016)
  • Do the Right Thing (1989)
  • Fruitvale Station (2013)
  • If Beale Street Could Talk (2018)
  • Selma (2014)
  • The Hate You Give (2018)
  • Pariah (2011)
  • Get Out (2017)
  • Say Her Name: The Life and Death of Sandra Bland (2018)
  • Dear White People [Film (2014) & Netflix series (2017-2021)]
  • 13th (2016) [Netflix]
  • When They See Us (2019) [Netflix]
  • Seven Seconds (2018) [Netflix]
  • Time: The Kalief Browder Story [Netflix]
  • See You Yesterday (2019) [Netflix]

Books

  • White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide (2016) ~Carol Anderson
  • How to Be An Antiracist (2019) ~Ibram X. Kendi
  • Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2018) ~Monique Morris
  • From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation (2016) ~Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
  • Between the World and Me (2015) ~Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • So you want talk about race (2019) ~Ijeoma Oluo
  • White Fragility: Why it’s so hard for white people to talk about racism (2018) ~Robin Diangelo
  • Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race (2017) ~Beverly D. Tatum
  • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the age of Colorblindness (2020) ~Michelle Alexander
  • Parable of the Sower (1993) ~Octavia E. Butler  
  • ‘Choke Hold’: Policing Black Men (2018) ~Paul Butler
  • Citizen: An American Lyric (2014) ~Claudia Rankine
  • Bad Feminist (2014 ) ~Roxane Gay
  • Heavy: An American Memoir (2019) ~Kiese Laymon
  • Racism Without Racists: Color-blind racism and the persistence of Racial Inequality in America (2017) ~Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
  • The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America (2018) ~Richard Rothstein
  • No Ashes in the Fire (2019) ~Darnell L. Moore
  • ‘When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir’ (2020) ~Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Asha Bandele
  • ‘Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower’ (2019) ~Brittney Cooper
  • ‘Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism’ (2018) ~Safiya Umoja Noble

This is not an end all, be all list, but meant to ignite and continue dialogues that can be difficult, but are very necessary. Hopefully, this list will also lead to the creation of building other resource guides that can be used in the fight against anti-Blackness and anti-racism. 

“We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.” ~Ella Baker